H. erectus

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H. erectus (Lined)

Other species pages:

H. abdominalis
H. algiricus
H. angustus

H. barbouri
H. bargibanti
H. borboniensis
H. breviceps
H. camelopardalis
H. capensis
H. colemani
H. comes
H. coronatus
H. denise
H. erectus
H. fisheri
H. fuscus
H. guttulatus
H. hippocampus
H. histrix
H. ingens
H. jayakari
H. kelloggi
H. kuda
H. lichtensteinii
H. minotauri

H. mohnikei
H. procerus
H. reidi
H. sindonis
H. spinosissimus
H. subelongatus
H. trimaculatus
H. tuberculatus
H. whitei
H. zebra
H. zosterae

Location:  Western Atlantic: Nova Scotia, Canada and northern Gulf of Mexico to Panama and Venezuela. A southern form that may prove to be a separate species is known from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and questionably from Suriname.

Environment:  depth range 1 - 73 m  Generally in coastal waters; often around man-made structures.  Those that live in Sargassum usually have bony protuberances and fleshy tabs that may serve as camouflage.  Move into deeper waters during winter.

Climate:  Tropical or Subtropical

Availability:  WC and CB are available

Physical Characteristics:  8 inches (20.3 cm), Coronet: variable   Spines: variable  Usually first, third, fifth, seventh and eleventh trunk rings enlarged (in most other species it is the first, fourth, seventh and eleventh); ; deep-bodied; cheek spine single or double.  Base colour variable–ash grey, orange, brown, yellow, red or black;  characteristic pattern of white lines following contour of neck; tiny white dots on tail; may have darker or paler ‘saddles’ across dorsal surface often in line with the more enlarged body rings.

Reproduction: 14 - 21 days (usually 14 in aquariums)

Other Information:  considered hardy, good first seahorse.  Some people are concerned that Erectus may be carriers of disease which they are immune to but which may infect other species that are kept with Erectus.  Use caution when keeping with other species.



 

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